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Bike Walk Connecticut

Bike Walk Connecticut is working to make the state safer for bicyclists and pedestrians. We are delighted to support their efforts with a significant donation, made in recognition of board members Sean Alexander and Colleen Kelly Alexander - a Clinton, CT couple who are dedicated advocates of bike safety. Connecticut ranks as the 18th deadliest state per capita for cyclists killed in traffic accidents. We have seen far too many devastating - and preventable - accidents involving bicyclists. Bike Walk Connecticut has taken the lead in highlighting the need for enhanced safety for cyclists and pedestrians. Bike Walk Connecticut seeks to change the culture of transportation and make Connecticut a better place to bike and walk. The organization advocates at the state government level for laws, policies, and funding that support active transportation. 

Young Connecticut woman wins $41.7 million verdict after becoming disabled on school trip

On March 27, 2013 a federal court jury in Bridgeport, CT returned a $41,750,000 verdict for a young woman who, after being bitten by an infected tick on a school-sponsored trip to China, contracted encephalitis and now suffers neurological disabilities and cannot speak.

What Every Patient Should Know

As reported by The Wall Street Journal this weekend, http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444620104578008263334441352.html?KEYWORDS=marty+makary about 25% of hospitalized patients are harmed by medical errors. The amount of patients killed each week by medical errors is enough to fill four jumbo jets. Why are these numbers so high, and why don't we hear more about this? Some doctors will overlook the mistakes of their colleagues because whistleblowers are often punished and criticized. Doctors who call out other doctors can be assigned to more emergency calls and even bad-mouthed and discredited in retaliation.

Little Girl's Drowning Death Used as Excuse for Bad Behavior by Club Executive Director

Brianna Murray's drowning death went unacknowledged by virtually everybody until Tuesday morning. Retemar Robinson was livid when she read the paper on Tuesday morning and discovered that Robert Generali, former executive director of the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Waterbury, was using the death of her daughter as an excuse for his alcohol abuse and subsequent crimes.

Connecticut River jet ski accident takes life of Meriden man

This time of year, people of all walks of life take to the open air to enjoy the Connecticut River. The largest flowing waterway in New England, it snakes southeast through Hartford and finally opens onto the Long Island Sound at Old Lyme and Old Saybrook. While the summer months allow us to ponder the simultaneous steadfastness and flow of the river, the tragedy of a recent jet ski accident is also a sobering reminder of how fragile life can be.

Wethersfield woman killed in vacation parasailing accident

A Connecticut man was forced to watch this week as his wife's parasailing harness broke and she plummeted 150 to 200 feet to the waters of Pompano Beach, Florida. The operators of the parasailing boat quickly reeled the man in from the couple's side-by-side parasail wing and circled back to pick up his wife. She was floating face down in the water in a state of cardiac arrest.

Sepsis Death in New York

Recently, a 12-year-old-boy, Rory Staunton, died of sepsis in a New York hospital. Rory had gotten a cut on his arm while playing basketball with his friends. Bacteria got into the cut and a few days later Rory was dead. The sepsis was a result of undiagnosed Streptococcus pyogenes, otherwise known as Strep A. Strep A is the bacteria that gives us Strep throat and is easily curable with a course of antibiotics. If it goes undiagnosed or untreated, however, it can have dire consequences, as was the case with Rory Staunton.

Danger of falling limbs from trees and injuries that have been caused

A disturbing article by William Glaberson and Lisa Foderaro in the New York Times today talks about the danger of falling limbs from trees, and the number of injuries that trees have caused in New York City alone. The article cites deep cutbacks in the amount of money the city spends on tree maintenance in the last few years as one of the main contributors to a recent uptick in tree related injuries and deaths that have resulted in millions of dollars in payouts by the City. Obviously, the savings are not worth the price of such injuries, not to mention the human cost to the individuals involved.