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Medical Malpractice Archives

New Studies on Medical Errors

A new study indicates that medical errors kill about 250-thousand people a year. The study, by surgeon and Johns Hopkins University professor Martin Makary, reveals that medical error may be the third leading cause of death in the United States, behind heart disease and cancer.

Infection and Death Linked to ERCP Procedure

Contaminated endoscopes are suspected of causing a deadly outbreak of the superbug CRE (carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae) at UCLA hospital in California, where at least 7 patients have been infected and 2 have died.Several other hospitals around the country have reported incidents of infection following ERCP procedures over the past couple of years.

Doctors Addicted More Often Than You Might Think

Jeff Rossen, in his Today Show segment The Rossen Reports, reported that a recent government study shows that at least 100,000 doctors (or 1 in 10 doctors currently working) are addicted to drugs and/or alcohol. And according the non-profit group Consume Watchdog, 18 percent of doctors have an addiction problem at some point during their career. Some of these doctors have managed to perform their duties while upholding their Hippocratic Oath to "do no harm." Unfortunately for some patients and their families, this has not been the case with some of the other doctors.

Fungal Meningitis Outbreak

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that 105 cases of fungal meningitis, in nine states across the US, have been linked to an outbreak resulting from contaminated steroid medication. To date, eight deaths have been associated with the outbreak.

Connecticut Hospitals not on List of Top Performers

The Joint Commission which is an organization that evaluates hospitals has issued its second annual report of hospital performance. Connecticut is one of only three states nationally without a single hospital designated as a "Top Performer." The other two states are North Dakota and South Dakota.

What Every Patient Should Know

As reported by The Wall Street Journal this weekend, http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444620104578008263334441352.html?KEYWORDS=marty+makary about 25% of hospitalized patients are harmed by medical errors. The amount of patients killed each week by medical errors is enough to fill four jumbo jets. Why are these numbers so high, and why don't we hear more about this? Some doctors will overlook the mistakes of their colleagues because whistleblowers are often punished and criticized. Doctors who call out other doctors can be assigned to more emergency calls and even bad-mouthed and discredited in retaliation.

Atrial Fibrillation "Weekend Effect"

A recent study using the National Inpatient Sample database for 2008 found that there was a "weekend effect" for patients admitted with atrial fibrillation. Previously, the "weekend effect" has been seen with stroke, myocardial infarction, gastrointestinal bleeding, and hospitalized patients with a wide variety of conditions. The "weekend effect" is a documented theory that states that patients admitted to hospitals on the weekend will not get the same level of care they would get on the weekdays, which results in higher weekend mortality rates.

Unnecessary Medical Procedures for Profit?

The New York Times is reporting that cardiologists have been performing unnecessary and dangerous cardiac procedures at HCA hospitals in Florida.http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/07/business/hospital-chain-internal-reports-found-dubious-cardiac-work.html?partner=rss&emc=rss